May 20

As I wrote in the garden post—and countless times beforehand—spending time in the garden (or outside in general) every day inspires plentiful ideas for the evening meal. In any given week (once things get growing) one is confronted with an array of plants at different stages of their lives: sprouts that need thinning, bolting things that need eating, things that bolted and didn’t get eaten so now they have pretty flowers or pungent seeds to use, and always various plants at peak maturity that are ready for their closeup.

Read the Post Don’t Call It A Comeback

May 19

The spring issue of Fish & Game Quarterly is out today. Appropriately for the issue that coincides with Zak (and by extension Jori and Kevin) winning a James Beard Award, we’ve got more contributors in more diverse media, organized loosely around the idea of place. This issue includes our first poetry offerings, plus music: besides an instrumental track, we’ve got two essays by two musicians, one of which is about a musician and which is accompanied by a photograph from still another musician. I find it particularly interesting to see work by people who are known for a different kind of work. Talented people tend to have more than one. Enjoy.

Read the Post Weird With A Beard

May 18

Front yards are overrated. Sure, it’s good to have some grassy space to kick a ball or toss a disc with the kid, but otherwise lawn is a waste of square feet and resources, especially water. Rip out the grass, run a nice fence around it, and build some raised beds, though, and you’ve got yourself a one-stop shop for food, physical activity, neighborly sharing, and epic curb appeal.

Read the Post I get my back into my living

March 8
February 8
November 16

Colder weather urges cooking in a way that summer’s insouciant plenitude cannot rival. Now that we’re down to about a third of the garden, it’s all roots and greens out there (though bolstered immeasurably in the kitchen by the deep benches of pantry and freezer). Their flavor—the sheer information, the resolution and detail in each bite of humble leaf or root, sweetened by frosts and elevated to center stage by the departure of the tender competition—presents targets both easy and challenging. Easy, because a fat fall turnip needs little embellishing to glow, and challenging because families are wont to clamor for novelty when it comes to dinner.

Read the Post So fall! Such good!

November 9

The beauty of having both a garden and way too much visual art training manifests itself in many subtle ways, most of them involving dinner. This iteration of inspiration began with the radicchio, arrayed as plump and shiny purple heads in the chicory bed. After a busy day loading frost-leveled detritus into the wheelbarrow for trips to the compost pile, I took stock of what remained: a lot.

Read the Post Purple Reign

November 2

For the new issue, we’ve expanded the Fish & Game Quarterly and given it its own site. We have also invited some estimable talents to contribute, in several genres besides culinary reportage: fiction, photo essay, and memoir. Future editions will expand further, into art, music, dance, poetry and random works of sui generis genius. It will mostly have somewhat to do with food, but may also not. Enjoy.

Read the Post No Quarter

June 18
March 25

Apart from a couple of gloriously warm days, winter’s death throes have been pretty assertively shitty. On Monday, the first day of sugaring, the sun felt warm enough that I was able to work outside for a few hours as I tended the fire and kept an eye on the sap’s progress so Danny could mix a record inside. The fire needs stoking every twenty minutes to maintain a rolling boil; that’s not a long enough interval for him to sink into his magic studio reverie, but it’s easy for me to get up from the laptop and throw a few logs in between sentences. And I obviously have my author photo taken care of, so there’s that.

Read the Post The Sappening, Part Two: Turning Fire To Steam